Usa India county Baxter virus Flushing Usa India county Baxter

Twice-daily nasal saline flushing may reduce Covid-19 severity: Study

Reading now: 807
www.livemint.com

extra hydration to your sinuses, it makes them function better," said Amy Baxter, from Augusta University, US. "If you have a contaminant, the more you flush it out, the better you are able to get rid of dirt, viruses and anything else," said Baxter, corresponding author of the study.

Read more for details Starting twice daily flushing of the nasal cavity with a mild saline solution soon after testing positive for Covid-19 may reduce hospitalisation due to the viral disease, a study claims.

The technique involves mixing a half teaspoon each of salt and baking soda in a cup of boiled water and then putting it into a sinus rinse bottle, making it a safe, effective and inexpensive way that can have a vital public health impact.

Participants 55 and older were enrolled within 24 hours of a positiveCOVID-19 test between 24 September and 21 December in 2020.

Read more on livemint.com
The website covid-19.rehab is an aggregator of news from open sources. The source is indicated at the beginning and at the end of the announcement. You can send a complaint on the news if you find it unreliable.

Related News

Canada’s rising prices becoming entrenched, recession may be needed: economists - globalnews.ca - Canada
globalnews.ca
46%
174
Canada’s rising prices becoming entrenched, recession may be needed: economists
inflation in Canada are likely to peak in the fourth quarter of this year, economists told Reuters, though most see signs fast rising prices are becoming entrenched and warn a recession may be needed to avoid a spiral.Canada’s inflation data for August will be released on Tuesday, with analysts forecasting the headline rate will edge down to 7.3 per cent, from 7.6 per cent in July and a four-decade high of 8.1 per cent in June.But all eyes will be on the three core measures of inflation – CPI Common, CPI Median and CPI Trim – which taken together are seen as a better indicator of underlying price pressures.The average of the three hit a record high of 5.3 per cent in July. Canada’s unemployment rate rose to 5.4% in August as interest rate hikes ‘bite’ Six of eight economists surveyed by Reuters see core inflation peaking in the fourth quarter as underlying domestic and global pressures start to ease, though the path back to the two per cent target will not be brisk.“Rapidly cooling growth, the pullback in housing prices, and less pressure on supply chains will help cap core inflation relatively soon,” said Doug Porter, chief economist at BMO Capital Markets.“However, we believe that it will be sticky, and will descend only slowly through 2023,” he added.The broadening of price increases, increased wage settlements, as well as rising consumer and business inflation expectations are signs that inflation is becoming more entrenched in the economy, economists told Reuters.
Marvin Lee Aday - Meat Loaf's tragic death - eerie premonition, Covid fears and years of health battles - dailystar.co.uk - city Hollywood
dailystar.co.uk
60%
913
Meat Loaf's tragic death - eerie premonition, Covid fears and years of health battles
Meat Loaf will go down in the history books as one of the greatest rock stars of all time.His legacy spans over five decades and he influenced the world of rock forever with his flamboyant presence and unique voice.He will be sorely missed and his music will still be enjoyed for years to come, but what was his life like and what were the events surrounding his tragic death?READ MORE: Meat Loaf video star Dana Patrick's transformation – new look and career 29 years onKeep reading to learn more about the powerhouse vocalist, his life, health struggles and his death as his iconic single I'd Do Anything For Love reaches its 29th anniversary.Meat Loaf, who rose to fame in the 70s and 80s, was born Marvin Lee Aday and was known for performative nature and theatrical voice.His catalogue of albums Bat Out Of Hell, Bat Out Of Hell II: Back Into Hell and Bat Out Of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose have all collectively sold more than a whopping 65 million copies worldwide.His astounding voice and rare stage presence earned the rock singer awards and he was given a Grammy for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance for his absolute classic I’d Do Anything For Love, but he liked to try his hand at different ventures too.The rock ‘n’ roll icon took his love for performing to the silver screen and was a regular in Hollywood, having starred in big name cult classics such as The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Fight Club,The Bat Out Of Hell singer had a number of ailments throughout his life and despite his powerhouse vocals, Meat Loaf suffered from asthma and once collapsed at a gig back in 2016.This wasn’t the first time, having collapsed years prior in 2011 and 2003.The cause of his 2016 fall was allegedly due to dehydration but later that
Anand Kumar - Winnipeg ICU doc says fall COVID bump may not hit as hard, but health system will be affected - globalnews.ca
globalnews.ca
92%
426
Winnipeg ICU doc says fall COVID bump may not hit as hard, but health system will be affected
intensive care doctor on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic says from his perspective, Manitobans may not be hit quite as hard by a fall wave of the virus as they have by other waves.Dr. Anand Kumar told 680 CJOB’s The News that he’s seen things generally improving on the COVID front.“I think we’re definitely getting there,” he said.“We’re still going to see significant surprises now and then — it’s probably not going to be everything rosy down the road, but on the overall angle, things are getting better.” Latest Manitoba numbers reveal COVID-19 severe outcomes up Kumar, who is also an infectious disease specialist, said one of the main problems he foresees with a fall wave will be hospital staff contracting the virus and missing work, thereby adding to the already serious staffing issues facing local hospitals.“Although we may not see the kind of numbers we’ve had in the past with ICU admissions and hospital admissions, we’re still going to see a significant bump,” he said.“Where we’re going to get hit is — given that there are no restrictions in the community — we’ll probably see a lot of health-care workers go down with COVID in terms of having to take time off work, and that will redouble the difficulty in terms of staffing.”According to last week’s provincial data, COVID-related hospitalizations had seen a slight increase, with 70 people taken to hospital, up from 67 the previous week.Of those Manitobans, 16 people were admitted to ICU, up from nine.As far as COVID prevention is concerned, booking appointments became available Monday for those who are eligible for the bivalent COVID-19 vaccine.
DMCA