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Use minimum force on unruly protests; Directive to Sri Lanka Police

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COLOMBO (News 1st); Sri Lanka’s Public Security Secretary has instructed Sri Lanka Police to use Minimum Force to control unruly situations at filling stations that arise due to the fuel crisis.This directive also applies to protests at filling stations.The Ministry of Public Security said that the directive was issued in order to maintain law and order in areas where protests are reported.It added that a discussion took place on Saturday (18) on seeking military assistance to control such situations.However, NO action will be taken against anyone engaged in peaceful dissent.

Protest have broken out at multiple filling stations due to the short supply of fuel in Sri Lanka, as it tries to overcome the worst economic crisis since 1948. .

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