experts: Last News

World has 10-week supply of wheat, expert tells UN Security Council: ‘This is seismic’

NOVOVORONTSOVKA, UKRAINE - MAY 06: Wheat lies piled in a grain warehouse earlier shelled by Russian forces on May 06, 2022 near the frontlines of Kherson Oblast in Novovorontsovka, Ukraine. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) NEW YORK - Global food insecurity has reached levels not seen since the financial crisis of 2008, and it’s only going to get worse without aggressive intervention, a food insecurity expert told the United Nations Security Council this week.Russia’s invasion of Ukraine "did not start a food security crisis," but it did add "fuel to a fire that was long burning," said Sara Menker, CEO of Gro Intelligence, a global company that uses artificial intelligence and public and private data to predict food supply trends."This isn’t cyclical.

This is seismic," Menker said during a special meeting of the UN Security Council. "Even if the war were to end tomorrow, our food security problem isn’t going away anytime soon without concerted action."Before the Russia-Ukraine conflict began, the two countries supplied a combined one third of the world’s wheat exports and were in the top five exporters of corn.

Coupled with widespread fertilizer shortages, supply chain issues and record droughts, the world has about 10 weeks worth of wheat on hand, Menker said."Without aggressive global actions, we stand the risk of an extraordinary amount of human suffering and economic damage," Menker said.Sara Menker, founder and chief executive officer of Gro Intelligence Inc., speaks during the Bloomberg New Economy Forum in Singapore, on Thursday, Nov. 18, 2021.

experts crisis prevention
www.fox29.comwww.fox29.com

experts: Main News

NOVOVORONTSOVKA, UKRAINE - MAY 06: Wheat lies piled in a grain warehouse earlier shelled by Russian forces on May 06, 2022 near the frontlines of Kherson Oblast in Novovorontsovka, Ukraine. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) NEW YORK - Global food insecurity has reached levels not seen since the financial crisis of 2008, and it’s only going to get worse without aggressive intervention, a food insecurity expert told the United Nations Security Council this week.Russia’s invasion of Ukraine "did not start a food security crisis," but it did add "fuel to a fire that was long burning," said Sara Menker, CEO of Gro Intelligence, a global company that uses artificial intelligence and public and private data to predict food supply trends."This isn’t cyclical.
marijuana more than eight days a month on average, while four-year students reported marijuana use about four and a half days a month.RELATED: Does 'hair of the dog' actually work after drinking alcohol? What experts say about the hangover 'cure'"I expected differences in both alcohol and marijuana use among two- and four-year college students, but was surprised by the magnitude of the differences given that the subjects are the same ages," said Jennifer Duckworth, an assistant professor at WSU and lead author of the paper.More research is needed to understand why, Duckworth said, but "perceptions of peer use" could be a contributing factor.RELATED: Frequent marijuana use may lead to higher risk of heart disease, study finds"Specifically, four-year students thought their peers drank more than two-year students believed their peers drank, whereas two-year students thought that their peers used cannabis more than four-year students thought their peers did," researchers said.The study’s authors admit it’s harder to examine two-year college students because they vary more in age and work status and are more likely to be from racial and ethnic minority groups.

Related News

'Not good' BBC's Simon Reeve gives health update on his 'exotic illness' to worried fans - express.co.uk
express.co.uk
61%
273
'Not good' BBC's Simon Reeve gives health update on his 'exotic illness' to worried fans
kavwire joked: "I thought you were pregnant at first …great news.”sierra_eco_bravo_alfa encouraged: “Keep on walking mate!”It is believed that the adventurer and documentary filmmaker picked up the exotic illness during one of his work trips, but he has not yet specified what the illness is.Last year, Simon revealed how he had managed to defy the odds after fertility doctors told him and his wife Anya that they had little to no chance of ever having children.The TV presenter and adventurer knew that he had always wanted to be a father, and thought of the role as his life's purpose.When he met and first started dating his wife, they were both in their early thirties, and Simon knew that if they were going to have children, it needed to be soon.However, once they started trying, he soon realised that conceiving a child was going to be a much harder task than he initially expected.After months of trying to conceive a baby naturally, Simon and Anya knew that something wasn’t quite right.Simon was left horrified when an expert told him that he was "basically infertile".Recalling the moment his world crumbled before him, Simon told his wife that if he couldn’t have children, he was "likely to go mad".“I would not be able to have children. It was the starkest of messages: I could hardly take it in,” Simon wrote.“She told me I had loads of sperm but their morphology was terrible.
Widespread systemic racism in Canadian military ‘repulsing’ new recruits: report - globalnews.ca - Canada - county Canadian
globalnews.ca
86%
549
Widespread systemic racism in Canadian military ‘repulsing’ new recruits: report
Systemic racism is rampant throughout the Canadian Armed Forces, “repulsing” new recruits and putting at risk the country’s national security if jobs continue to go unfilled, according to a bombshell report.In stark terms, the report probing racism in the Canadian military lays out the rationale for why fixing the “toxic” environment goes to the heart of the military’s ability to do the crucial jobs entrusted to it.To sum it up: more and more Canadians will have no interest in joining until the military fixes its longstanding, interconnected issues of racism, abuse of power, gender discrimination and sexual misconduct.As part of that, the report says military brass must accept that some members will either leave, or need to be removed.“Racism in Canada is not a glitch in the system; it is the system,” reads the report by the Minister of National Defence’s Advisory Panel on Systemic Racism and Discrimination. Over 50% of Canadians think systemic racism built into country’s institutions, poll says The report offered recommendations across 13 areas of the military’s culture and systems, and examined the full spectrum of racism and discrimination including the barriers facing Black, Indigenous, LGBTQ2+ and women within the ranks, as well as the barriers facing Canadians with disabilities.Its findings come at a time when the Canadian Forces is already facing what experts have repeatedly called an existential “crisis” about allegations of sexual misconduct within its senior ranks, as first reported by Global News in Feb.
Green wedding ideas for an eco-friendly, affordable celebration - fox29.com - city Detroit
fox29.com
89%
182
Green wedding ideas for an eco-friendly, affordable celebration
Earth Day and wedding season in full swing, many people are turning to eco-friendly ways to have a sustainable wedding in 2022. "Your wedding is meant to be the greatest day of your life, but with tossed paper goods, excess food thrown away, and leftover flowers dumped in the garbage, it can also be one of the most wasteful," Brides.com noted. Now, we're not saying you should skip hosting a party or forgo those beautiful details, but if you are an eco-conscious bride or groom and want to reduce your event’s effect on the environment, here are some sustainable methods that are shaping the bridal industry and can ultimately reduce your wedding carbon's footprint.A green wedding is any wedding where the couple plans to decrease the ecological impact of their special event on the planet."Today’s couples are concerned about the state of the planet and are passionate about lowering their carbon footprints as much as possible," photographer Nikk Nuygen told the blog Junebug Weddings. "Most modern couples don’t want a wedding full of excess waste and unnecessary items, especially with the increasing costs!" Wedding tablescape and decor (Credit: Something Borrowed Blooms) And these days, wedding experts say it’s not too hard to accomplish, with many more eco-friendly wedding decorations on the market and greener options for catering, invitations, and more.While you may want to invite everyone you know to your wedding, it can end up being more wasteful and ultimately more costly. RELATED: Learn Sustainable Wedding Planning with Detroit CultivatedSo, it’s simple: the smaller your guest list, the less waste you will end up producing. For most weddings, flowers are used for a few hours before being thrown away.
DMCA