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In Pennsylvania, Shapiro's low-key style poses test for Dems

BETHLEHEM, PA - SEPTEMBER 22: Pennsylvania Attorney General and Democratic Nominee for Governor Josh Shapiro holds a Northampton County Meet & Greet event at United Steelworkers on September 22, 2022 in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Shapiro faces CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Doug Mastriano, the Republican nominee for governor in Pennsylvania, is perhaps best known as an election denier who was at the U.S.

Capitol on Jan. 6.

John Fetterman, the Democrat hoping to flip the state's Senate seat, has revolutionized how campaigns use social media. And Dr.

Mehmet Oz was a TV celebrity long before he launched a GOP Senate campaign.And then there's Josh Shapiro.In one of the most politically competitive states in the U.S., the Democratic contender for governor is waging a notably drama-free campaign, betting that a relatively under-the-radar approach will resonate with voters exhausted by a deeply charged political environment. But Shapiro faces a test of whether his comparatively low-key style will energize Democrats to rally against Mastriano, who many in the party view as an existential threat.The GOP candidate, who worked to keep Donald Trump in power and overturn President Joe Biden's victory in 2020, supports ending abortion rights and would be in position to appoint the secretary of state, who oversees elections in this state that is often decisive in choosing presidents.The tension of Shapiro's strategy was on display during a recent swing through this small city, a dot in deeply Republican south central Pennsylvania.

He spent 10 minutes ticking through his record as a two-term attorney general and his policy goals if he becomes governor, such as expanding high-speed internet and boosting school funding. But he also acknowledged

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Donald Trump Joe Biden Mehmet Oz Josh Shapiro John Fetterman Doug Mastriano

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Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current president of the United States. Before entering politics, he was a businessman and television personality. Trump was born and raised in Queens, a borough of New York City, and received a bachelor's degree in economics from the Wharton School. He took charge of his family's real-estate business in 1971, renamed it The Trump Organization, and expanded its operations from Queens and Brooklyn into Manhattan. The company built or renovated skyscrapers, hotels, casinos, and golf courses. Trump later started various side ventures, mostly by licensing his name. He produced and hosted The Apprentice, a reality television series, from 2003 to 2015. As of 2019, Forbes estimated his net worth to be $3.1 billion
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