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Boris Johnson
Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson Hon FRIBA  (born 19 June 1964) is a British politician, writer, and former journalist serving as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party since 2019. He was Foreign Secretary from 2016 to 2018 and Mayor of London from 2008 to 2016. Johnson was Member of Parliament for Henley from 2001 to 2008 and has been MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip since 2015. Ideologically, Johnson identifies as a one-nation conservative.
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Usa hospital covid-19 death pandemic vaccine infection reports Usa

Most Now Say Pandemic Is Over, but Normalcy Remains Elusive

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news.gallup.com

lowest since June 2021, when vaccinations were on the rise, many restrictions were being rolled back, and the public was hopeful that the pandemic was winding down.

That hope proved short-lived as the arrival of the disease’s delta variant brought a sharp increase in infections, hospitalizations and deaths in summer 2021.In all, just 2% of U.S.

adults now say they are “very worried,” while 16% are “somewhat worried,” 36% “not too worried” and 46% “not worried at all” that they will get the coronavirus.

This marks the highest percentage saying they are not worried at all about contracting COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic.

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The website covid-19.rehab is an aggregator of news from open sources. The source is indicated at the beginning and at the end of the announcement. You can send a complaint on the news if you find it unreliable.

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