state Oklahoma: Last News

Oklahoma plans to execute about 1 inmate per month for 29 months

Lethal injection chamber (Photo by William F. Campbell/Getty Images) OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. - Oklahoma will execute about one inmate each month for the next 29 months, a number that accounts for more than half of the state’s death row population.According to the Death Penalty Information Center, a nonprofit death penalty research organization, the first scheduled execution is set for Aug.

25. Roughly one execution per month will follow through the end of 2024.

The 25 inmates scheduled to die account for more than half of the 42-plus inmates on death row.The rapid execution schedule was released about a month after a federal judge ruled the state’s three-drug lethal injection method is constitutional. That ruling stems from a six-day federal trial in which attorneys for 28 death row inmates argued the first of the three drugs, the sedative midazolam, is not adequate to render an inmate unable to feel pain. Attorneys claimed it creates a risk of severe pain and suffering that violates the U.S.

Constitution’s Eighth Amendment prohibiting cruel and unusual punishment.RELATED: Death row inmates' last meals: What to know about the history behind our strange fascination of these requestsInmate James Coddington, convicted of killing his coworker in 1997 because he wouldn’t lend him money for drugs, is first on the list. Coddington’s March 10 execution was postponed after a judge allowed him to join the lawsuit that ultimately failed.RELATED: South Carolina inmate picks firing squad over electric chairThe South Carolina Department of Corrections (SCDC) informed Attorney General Alan Wilson Friday that they are prepared to carry out executions by firing squad as required by law, according to a news release.Oklahoma had one of the

. death information

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