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Best, worst states for summer road trips in 2022: report

FILE - Drone aerial view of winding road and red car in Utah. (Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)If you are planning to hit the road this summer but are not sure where to go, you might want to consider New York state. That is according to a report from WalletHub, which found the best and worst states for summer road trips in 2022.

The Empire State was at the top of its list. For its report, WalletHub compared all 50 U.S. states based on 32 metrics in three categories: costs, safety and activities. LAS VEGAS ‘PROPERTY SPOUSES’ WHO RENOVATE RVS ARE TESTAMENT TO VEHICLE’S POPULARITY DESPITE INFLATIONAside from its overall ranking, WalletHub also found how states ranked based on specific metrics. For example, the report found that Georgia has the lowest average gas prices, while three states – Nevada, Hawaii and California – tied for the state with the highest average gas prices,TIPS FOR ROAD TRIPPING WITH DOGS, FROM PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN A VAN YEAR-ROUNDOhio was found to have the lowest average cost of car repairs, while California was found to have the highest. Mississippi had the lowest cost of camping while Illinois and California had the highest cost of camping. HOW TO ROAD TRIP WITH KIDS, FROM PARENTS WHO LIVE IN A BUS YEAR-ROUNDWalletHub found that five states – Alaska, Hawaii, California, Florida and Washington – tied for the state with the highest percentage of total area designated as national parkland, while Illinois had the lowest percentage. Meanwhile, Oregon was found to have the most scenic byways, while Connecticut was found to have the fewest.GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERETo see the overall results, here are the best and worst states for summer road trips this

. reports Citi
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