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As inflation soars, one-third of Americans are experiencing financial stress: Survey

inflation in nearly four decades is inflicting financial pain on millions of Americans as prices for everyday necessities like food and gasoline soar higher, according to a new Census Bureau survey. More than one-third of households reported difficulties in paying bills from April 27 through May 9, according to the Census Bureau's latest household pulse survey. The share of Americans who have said it is somewhat or very difficult to pay for usual household expenses is now hovering near its 2020 peak, at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.RELATED: US inflation hit 8.3% in April but slows from 40-year highIn some states, the percentage of Americans struggling to pay their bills is even higher: Nearly half of households in Mississippi – about 45% – reported difficulties in paying for usual household expenses, while that figure was about 43.6% in Kentucky and 41.8% in West Virginia. A man shops at a Safeway grocery store in Annapolis, Maryland, on May 16, 2022, as Americans brace for summer sticker shock as inflation continues to grow.

(Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images) Close to 40% of respondents in Alabama, Oklahoma, Wyoming and California said they were struggling to cover usual expenses, according to the household pulse survey.The average American is likely shelling out an extra $311 a month because of inflation, according to a recent Moody's Analytics analysis. The financial squeeze stems from the rising cost of a number of everyday goods, including cars, rent, food, gasoline and health care.Inflation accelerated again in April, the Labor Department reported last week, with the consumer price index rising by 8.3%.

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inflation in nearly four decades is inflicting financial pain on millions of Americans as prices for everyday necessities like food and gasoline soar higher, according to a new Census Bureau survey. More than one-third of households reported difficulties in paying bills from April 27 through May 9, according to the Census Bureau's latest household pulse survey. The share of Americans who have said it is somewhat or very difficult to pay for usual household expenses is now hovering near its 2020 peak, at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.RELATED: US inflation hit 8.3% in April but slows from 40-year highIn some states, the percentage of Americans struggling to pay their bills is even higher: Nearly half of households in Mississippi – about 45% – reported difficulties in paying for usual household expenses, while that figure was about 43.6% in Kentucky and 41.8% in West Virginia. A man shops at a Safeway grocery store in Annapolis, Maryland, on May 16, 2022, as Americans brace for summer sticker shock as inflation continues to grow.
AP.  The cadets will instead graduate with bachelor's degrees. 

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These single moms needed support so they bought a house, raise kids together - fox29.com - city Washington, area District Of Columbia - area District Of Columbia - Washington, area District Of Columbia - county Park - state Maryland - county Harper
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These single moms needed support so they bought a house, raise kids together
TAKOMA PARK, Md. - It’s something you read about in books or see on television, but for friends Holly Harper and Herrin Hopper, it’s a reality.The two single moms found themselves in challenging times at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown in 2020. Needing support, the two took a daydream and made it a reality when they bought a house and moved in together with their children in June 2020. They then started renting out other spaces in the house to other women, eventually forming the Siren House.The Siren House, located outside Washington, D.C., contains four separate apartments.  (Holly Harper)RELATED: Identical twin brothers each receive heart transplants: 'Quite unique'The Siren House is a four-unit home located in Takoma Park, Maryland, outside Washington, D.C. "We are here for emotional support, friendships, sharing bottles of ketchup," Hopper told FOX Television Stations. "What I think Siren House is...is a safe place for people to be while they figure out things that are hard," Harper added. The massive home offers communal-style living space with each woman able to have their own living quarters with their own bedrooms and bathrooms. "We are here for emotional support, friendships, sharing bottles of ketchup," Herrin Hopper said.  (Holly Harper)Harper and Hopper said they have been friends for more than six years, but hard times fell on both of them.Harper said between 2018 and 2020, she went through a divorce, health scares and deaths in the family, including her father who died from COVID-19. Hopper was also going through her own ordeals, including a divorce.The ladies often talked, sometimes about finding new places to live.
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