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COVID-19 Scan for May 10, 2022

Study details risk factors for maternal COVID-19 death in Latin America

An observational study using a multinational database of 447 maternal COVID-19 deaths in Latin America reveals that over 90% were attributed to acute respiratory failure after severe infection and that 35% of the women who died were never admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), possibly due to lack of capacity.

The analysis, led by researchers at the Universidad de Cartagena in Colombia, involved 447 maternal deaths attributed to COVID-19 in eight Latin American countries from Mar 1, 2020, to Nov 29, 2021.

The investigators obtained data on COVID-related maternal deaths in Costa Rica (11 deaths), Ecuador (55), Honduras (126), Paraguay (86), the Dominican Republic (30), Colombia (84), Bolivia (21), and Peru (34).

At maternal death, median age was 31 years and median gestational age was 31 weeks. A total of 86.4% of the women tested positive for COVID-19 before delivery, with 60.3% of cases identified in the third trimester.

The most common symptoms at hospitalization were shortness of breath (73.0%), fever (69.0%), and cough (59.0%). Of the women who died, 90.4% had organ dysfunction at admission, nearly half were obese, 9.2% had a history of diabetes, 8.4% had a history of high blood pressure, and 25.3% were older than 35 years. Overall, 64.8% of women were admitted to an ICU for a median of 8 days. Eight deaths occurred among healthcare workers.

Median time from symptom onset to death was 14 days, Most deaths occurred in the first 6 weeks after delivery, with a median of 7 days between childbirth and death. The most common perinatal complication was preterm delivery (76.9%), and 59.9% of infants were of low birth weight.

The researchers called for

covid-19 death Health
www.cidrap.umn.eduwww.cidrap.umn.edu

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An observational study using a multinational database of 447 maternal COVID-19 deaths in Latin America reveals that over 90% were attributed to acute respiratory failure after severe infection and that 35% of the women who died were never admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), possibly due to lack of capacity.The analysis, led by researchers at the Universidad de Cartagena in
Dominican Republic as soon as Tuesday amid an ongoing case involving packages of presumed cocaine found onboard an aircraft they were operating, the airline says.In a letter sent to Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly, Pivot Airlines CEO Eric Edmondson appealed to the government to do more to intervene.“We are reaching out to you to request your urgent assistance in ensuring the safe return of the Canadian aircrew being wrongfully held in the Dominican Republic,” Edmondson wrote.“For more than 24 days, our crew has been subject to threats against their lives, inhumane treatment, and arbitrary detention, for dutifully reporting a crime and averting a potential aviation disaster.

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