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Jeopardy! host Mayim Bialik announces she has tested positive for COVID-19: 'It's no joke over here'

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Jeopardy! host Mayim Bialik announced she has tested positive for coronavirus.'I have COVID, saying that, and it’s no joke over here,' the 46-year-old actress said in an Instagram Live clip on Sunday.Bialik said she was gathering suggested remedies including zinc, vitamin C, lemon juice, ginger and turmeric.

The latest:Jeopardy! host Mayim Bialik, 46, announced she has tested positive for coronavirus. She was snapped in May in NYCThe Big Bang Theory alum said that she was dealing with tightness in her chest and severe exhaustion amid the illness.'The exhaustion hits like that, where you cannot be awake,' she said. 'You can try to be awake, but, then, all of a sudden, you need to sleep.' The Blossom star said that she regretted not wearing a mask at times, saying, 'Why did I ever go out?

Why did I think everything was fine ever?'Bialik said she is immunocompromised in also dealing with asthma. Bialik said she was gathering suggested remedies including zinc, vitamin C, lemon juice, ginger and turmeric The Blossom star said that she regretted not wearing a mask at times, saying, 'Why did I ever go out?

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NASA wants its moon dust, cockroaches from Apollo 11 mission pulled from auction - fox29.com - city Boston
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NASA wants its moon dust, cockroaches from Apollo 11 mission pulled from auction
(RR Auction)BOSTON - NASA wants its moon dust and cockroaches back.The space agency has asked Boston-based RR Auction to halt the sale of moon dust collected during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission that had subsequently been fed to cockroaches during an experiment to determine if the lunar rock contained any sort of pathogen that posed a threat to terrestrial life.The material, a NASA lawyer said in a letter to the auctioneer, still belongs to the federal government.The material from the experiment, including a vial with about 40 milligrams of moon dust and three cockroach carcasses, was expected to sell for at least $400,000, but has been pulled from the auction block, RR said Thursday."All Apollo samples, as stipulated in this collection of items, belong to NASA and no person, university, or other entity has ever been given permission to keep them after analysis, destruction, or other use for any purpose, especially for sale or individual display," said NASA's letter dated June 15.It went on: "We are requesting that you no longer facilitate the sale of any and all items containing the Apollo 11 Lunar Soil Experiment (the cockroaches, slides, and post-destructive testing specimen) by immediately stopping the bidding process," NASA wrote.In another letter dated June 22, NASA's lawyer asked RR Auction to work with the current owner of the material to return it to the federal government.The Apollo 11 mission brought more than 47 pounds (21.3 kilograms) of lunar rock back to Earth. Some was fed to insects, fish and other small creatures to see if it would kill them.
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