China India city Guangzhou, China death Health reports China India city Guangzhou, China

Can drinking coffee ward off death? New study shares potential health benefits

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coffee or coffee sweetened with sugar were less likely to die during a seven-year follow-up period. The latest findings are published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

While previous studies observing the health effects of coffee have found that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, it did not distinguish between unsweetened coffee and coffee consumed with sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Researchers from Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China used data from the U.K. Biobank study health behaviour questionnaire to evaluate the associations of consumption of sugar-sweetened, artificially sweetened, and unsweetened coffee with all-cause and cause-specific mortality, according to ANI report.

Over 171,000 participants from the U.K. without known heart disease or cancer were asked several dietary and health behaviour questions to determine coffee consumption habits and the authors found that during the 7-year follow-up period, participants who drank any amount of unsweetened coffee were 16 to 21 percent less likely to die than participants who did not drink coffee, the report said.

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